Sony Releases UXGA Resolution 0.5-inch OLED Microdisplay
- May 31, 2018 -

Sony recently announced that it will soon release the ECX339A OLED microdisplay with UXGA resolution (1600 x 1200), which is currently the highest specification of this type of 0.5-inch. Using Sony's OLED display technology and miniaturization technology, the product achieves the world's smallest pixel pitch of 6.3 μm, resulting in a 1.6x increase in resolution over previous models.

By adopting a new driver circuit design that requires only half the voltage of the predecessor model, it achieves higher resolution while achieving the same level of low power consumption as the previous generation. Relevant person in charge said that when used in conjunction with Sony's original drive system, it can support up to 240Hz frame rate, 2 times the previous product.

Increasing the resolution on a microdisplay often suffers from degradation of image quality due to problems such as reduced pixel pitch and poor viewing angle. The new products use optimized transistor layouts and processes to solve the problem of non-uniformity and breakdown voltage, all of which are related to transistor miniaturization. Sony's unique variation compensation circuit also improves picture quality. In addition, the filter is directly deposited on the silicon substrate, reducing the distance from the light emitting layer, and the color array of the filter is also modified. This helps to ensure viewing characteristics while achieving high resolution.

OLED microdisplays are widely used in digital camera electronic viewfinders (EVFs) for their superior high contrast, high color gamut, and high response. Sony has achieved this high resolution and high frame rate, and now it can provide more realistic image display and precise shooting theme for high-end cameras with extremely high image quality requirements.

Looking ahead, Sony hopes that this high-resolution OLED microdisplay can be applied in various fields and applications such as AR (Augmented Reality) and VR (Virtual Reality) head-mounted displays.